Tuesday, February 26, 2013

Art Bead Scene February Challenge


If you recall from my insanity post, my sketch, while sketchy, proposed a rather elaborate necklace design for this month's Art Bead Scene February Challenge.

Sketch - Art Bead Scene - February2013

Art Bead Scene February 2013 Challenge

For the necklace components I'm focusing on the lines in the architecture. For the embellishments and focal bead I'm focusing on the tree and the pink blossoms.

The picture the design is based on is:


Heijinja, 1941
Tōshi Yoshida
Woodblock Print

From my insanity post you'll also remember that I've overloaded myself this month. I just feel horrible that I didn't find more time for this project before the deadline because there were so many interesting elements that I wanted to bring from the print to the necklace. What I have so far is the unembellished core of the design:

Art Bead Scene February 2013 Challenge

Part of the reason I didn't find more time for this project was that I was pretty mentally overwhelmed by the idea of constructing the architectural connecting components. It was a labor intensive process of carefully measuring the square wire, carefully filing the corners so they'd be sharp and tight (which they weren't always), soldering the joints, pickling and cleaning, soldering on the loops, pickling and cleaning, measuring and filing the wires for the interior detail, and soldering once more. You'll, perhaps, understand why I opted just to keep the heat patina as the finish. :) Rust-orange enough for my willingness at the time.

The further frustrating part was that I didn't really have the colors I wanted for the lampwork focal bead (which arrived ... yes, today), so I didn't even work on refining the design to more accurately portray the tree and colors from the print.

In the end I don't want to come off as totally negative about this piece. I am still excited about the core design. I think it does a good job of combining the bold architectural elements of the print and combining them with the softer, more organic elements we see in the tree and background. The fringe, in soft pinks and some sage green, will further enhance that softness, once added. Like anyone, I suppose, I'm just frustrated that I couldn't bring the vision together before the final deadline. In the end, I'm comfortable serving as a cautionary tale.

:)

So, here's what it looks like now that It's done.

Art Bead Scene February 2013 Challenge
From this view you can see the whole necklace including the back. I used a simple hook clasp and added just a few Swarovski as fringe to embellish the back.

Art Bead Scene February 2013 Challenge
Here's a look at the front of the necklace as it hangs. I really do love what the fringe add to the necklace. It softens the hard lines of the copper connectors so much.

Art Bead Scene February 2013 Challenge
Here's a close up view of the architectural components I fabricated for this design, made out of square copper wire and copper sheet metal.

Art Bead Scene February 2013 Challenge
And one last view of the whoe thing from the front.

So, how'd I do?

Thanks so much for stopping by!
Julie


7 comments:

  1. I love the concept and execution. It's a beautiful piece. I appreciate all the work that went into the coppersmithed portion and can only imagine the work involved in lampworking that lovely focal.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. thank you so much, Susan! I think that the coppersmithing felt more overwhelming to me because I don't practice those skills as frequently as I should ... usually in favor of going to the studio to make beads :) If a bead takes me half an hour ... meh! It's funny how our perspective shifts!

      Delete
  2. HI, Julie. I had to hop over to your blog when I saw your intriguing piece on flickrABS. Absolutely love the design of the chain with lamp work bead and applaud your efforts to execute what you imagined in your head and on paper. That's where the rubber meets the road for us. (Or the metal meets the bench block). Love the heat patina finish on this too. Thanks for sharing your experience with us.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That's so sweet, thank you! I had to laugh when I popped over to yout blog ... I'm glad I wasn't the only one pushing the deadline :)

      Delete
  3. Oh, my! I could hang out on your blog all day! Just keep looking at all the details in this piece. Especially love how you've let the midtones dominate, and then you dance around the necklace with those luxurious darks and lights. Fabulous!!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Awww. Thanks, Karin! That's just beyond sweet. I do try to be entertaining :) I wish I could say that that tonal balance was a conscious choice; I just let the print be my guide. I feel like it's a case of: learn something until you don't have to think about it anymore, then don't think about it anymore because your head will just mess it up.

      Delete
  4. Julie, I had to come back and look at this for a second time. This is really quite an amazing piece of jewelry. I love the architectural aspect that you added to it. How wonderfully talented you are! So fortunate to have you as my Bead Soup Partner!

    ReplyDelete